Book Review:

The Modern Commando Science of Guerilla Self-Defense For The Home Front, by George F. Jowett

(Very rare, scarce Publication – No information available regarding availability, but may be obtainable through a search firm like ABE Books, etc.)

This little gem is a collector's item. It contains excellent counsel on how to handle an attacker, but will be no revelation for anyone ho has read Kill Or Get Killed or All-In Fighting. Still, if you collect publications on close combat and self-defense you will want to obtain a copy, if you can locate one.

This little gem is a collector's item. It contains excellent counsel on how to handle an attacker, but will be no revelation for anyone ho has read Kill Or Get Killed or All-In Fighting. Still, if you collect publications on close combat and self-defense you will want to obtain a copy, if you can locate one.

GEORGE F. Jowett was one of the greatest physical culturists, wrestlers, and strongmen in American history. His many works on physical training and self-improvement are available in reprint editions, and offer excellent advice and encouragement for all men who seek strength, health, a good physique, self-confidence, and interesting counsel on how to develop the ability to perform real “strongman” feats.

In today’s moronic “bodybuilding” sewer, where bloated, steroid-induced size, unhealthy living and training methods abound as mainstream, and the marvelous principles of sane, truly beneficial physical culture via progressive resistance exercise have been all but totally relegated to a kind of “underground”, Jowett’s works remain classics . . . as do the works of Rader, Hoffman, and a very few others.

The Modern Commando Science of Guerilla Self-Defense is perhaps the least kown of George F. Jowett’s works. It is a small pamphlet, but as the saying goes: “Good things come in small packages”.

A photo of the late Master Physical Culturist Jowett lifting up a 168 pound anvil with one hand — by the horn! If you think this is nothing much, try it. Better yet: Go to some "bodybuilding" gym and ask the strongest of the steroid products in the place to try it.

A photo of the late Master Physical Culturist Jowett lifting up a 168 pound anvil with one hand — by the horn! If you think this is nothing much, try it. Better yet: Go to some "bodybuilding" gym and ask the strongest of the steroid products in the place to try it.

During the war years (world war two) Jowett took up the task of presenting to his many correspondence students and  readers a small but practical little booklet on how to turn a physical assailant inside out, should the situation requiring that he act in self-defense ever arise for the reader.

We cannot categorize this booklet with Kill or Get Killed, All-In Fighting, Cold Steel, or any of the other true combatives classics that are all but required additions to the serious enthusiast’s personal library; yet we really love this sensible and forthright little Manual, and a rare copy is sequestered away amongst the endless deluge of printed materials in our private collection of publications on close combat, self-defense, weaponry, and physical training. We mention this work here in our Book Review Section to make our visitors aware of its existence (and to make them aware of the magnificent George F. Jowett, who bears the same relation to modern day “bodybuilders” as George Washington bears to the sort of creatures who infect that area of our Nation known as Washington, D.C., today).

In this pamphlet Jowett expounds succinctly upon the basic ideas and a few excellent (albeit well known amongst all serious close combat teachers) physical techniques of serious defense. The Manual isn’t illustrated and it isn’t by any means a “complete” or even near complete treatment of the subject. But there’s nothing in it that doesn’t make good sense; and it stands as a little gem of a classic by a real giant of a man in the physical training field.

If you are a collector then you will definitely want to add this title to your search list. If you’re not a collector, well, forgive us then . . . but we had to give tribute via this review to a good work by someone we have admired for decades, and we realize that — unless someone reprints it and offers it for about ten bucks — you probably won’t be missing any essential instruction by not reading it.